Cotton Kills

spiritsiege:

3 days left!

The Spirit Siege Kickstarter has less than $3k to go!  You can help this friendly, inclusive strategy game come to life!

All backers get immediate access to the Backer Build of the game!  For just $1, you can play Spirit Siege right now on android devices—and share it with your friends! Just look in the updates for Update #17.

So my sister ( http://infjdoodles.tumblr.com/ ) is a part of a gaming company called Nova Heartbeat—founded and created by herself and some colleagues from Digipen. They’re currently developing Spirit Siege, which is an AWWDOORAABUUL and AWESOMAZING strategy card game for iOS and Android.

As of this post, they are at 95% of the way to their goal, with two days remaining—only needing a bit of a nudge now! Will you please help them out, or at least take a look at their Kickstarter?

May your spiffiness spiffify!

— 28 minutes ago with 15 notes
#Spirit Siege  #Kickstarter  #VIDJA GAEM  #Video Game  #Adorable  #Awesome  #Really is a lot of fun--played it when I visited her in Washington for PAX 
methmonday:



The sky when it snows is absolutely perfect. It can be 1 o’clock in the morning and bright outside. The silence of everything when it snows is beautiful. You can barely hear a sound when the snow covers everything. Just watching the snow fall and stick to the ground is beautiful. Yeah I guess it sucks that it’s cold and you have to shovel it out, but coming in from the cold and putting on warm clothes, sitting in the heat, and drinking hot chocolate is so relaxing. I miss the snow so much.

Thiss

methmonday:

The sky when it snows is absolutely perfect. It can be 1 o’clock in the morning and bright outside. The silence of everything when it snows is beautiful. You can barely hear a sound when the snow covers everything. Just watching the snow fall and stick to the ground is beautiful. Yeah I guess it sucks that it’s cold and you have to shovel it out, but coming in from the cold and putting on warm clothes, sitting in the heat, and drinking hot chocolate is so relaxing. I miss the snow so much.

Thiss

(Source: tangledleaves)

— 42 minutes ago with 525638 notes
#Nostalgia  #Snow  #Winter  #Nature 

razielvonfreak:

It’s a dream come true for anyone who has ever spent an evening at the Renaissance Faire wishing that they could wear the pretty dresses AND the awesome armor. We utterly love this fashion spread from designer Pinkabsinthe.

(via saxophoneassassin)

— 43 minutes ago with 89520 notes
#rENAISSANCE  #Armour  #Dress  #Fashion  #Armour Dress  #Mi amor el armour 

cross-connect:

Kai Bartels is a 34 year old from Braunschweig, Germany who works as a designer for a small advertising agency. In his spare time he tries to learn or test functions of Cinema 4D in order to make GIFs. He likes to keep his animations very simple using basic shapes and very few colours. You can find his work posted on Tumblr as hallokai-stuff.

##

(via crossconnectmag)

— 3 days ago with 414 notes
#Kai Bartels  #Cinema 4D  #hallokai-stuff  #3D  #Animation  #Geometry  #Optical Illusion  #Fascinating 

coldplay:

An exhibition of Mila Fürstová’s Ghost Stories artwork is coming to London in December, in aid of Kids Company. Info: http://cldp.ly/GSexhbtn

(via forte-rock)

— 3 days ago with 1153 notes
#Mila Fürstová  #Ghost Stories  #Coldplay  #Art  #Album Art 

misscomstock:

Will the circle be unbroken by and by, b y  a n d  b y ?
Is a better home awaiting in the sky, i n  t h e  s k y ?

(via coooooooooooooorvo)

— 3 days ago with 1989 notes
#Bioshock Infinite  #VIDJA GAEM  #Animation 
courtneyhellenphoto:

the best shot I’ve taken of blue pool to this day. it’s definitely cold, definitely worth getting in, and definitely one of the most beautiful places I’ve ever seen.

courtneyhellenphoto:

the best shot I’ve taken of blue pool to this day. it’s definitely cold, definitely worth getting in, and definitely one of the most beautiful places I’ve ever seen.

— 3 days ago with 65897 notes
#Oregon  #Tamolitch Pool  #Blue Pool  #Lake  #Nature  #Photography 
neurosciencestuff:

Those with episodic amnesia are not ‘stuck in time,’ says philosopher Carl Craver
In 1981, a motorcycle accident left Toronto native Kent Cochrane with severe brain damage and dramatically impaired episodic memory. Following the accident, Cochrane could no longer remember events from his past. Nor could he predict specific events that might happen in the future.
When neuroscientist Endel Tulving, PhD, asked him to describe what he would do tomorrow, Cochrane could not answer and described his state of mind as “blank.”
Psychologists and neuroscientists came to know Cochrane, who passed away earlier this year, simply as “KC.” Many scientists have described KC as “stuck in time,” or trapped in a permanent present.
It has generally been assumed that people with episodic amnesia experience time much differently than those with more typical memory function. 
However, a recent paper in Neuropsychologia co-authored by Carl F. Craver, PhD, professor of philosophy and of philosophy-neuroscience-psychology, both in Arts & Sciences at Washington University in St. Louis, disputes this type of claim.
“It’s our whole way of thinking about these people that we wanted to bring under pressure,” Craver said. “There are sets of claims that sound empirical, like ‘These people are stuck in time.’ But if you ask, ‘Have you actually tested what they know about time?’ the answer is no.”
Time and consciousness
A series of experiments convinced Craver and his co-authors that although KC could not remember specific past experiences, he did in fact have an understanding of time and an appreciation of its significance to his life.
Interviews with KC by Craver and his colleagues revealed that KC retained much of what psychologists refer to as “temporal consciousness.” KC could order significant events from his life on a timeline, and he seemed to have complete mastery of central temporal concepts.
For example, KC understood that events in the past have already happened, that they influence the future, and that once they happen, they cannot be changed. 
He also knew that events in the future don’t remain in the future, but eventually become present. Even more interestingly, KC’s understanding of time influenced his decision-making.
If KC truly had no understanding of time, Craver argues, then he and others with his type of amnesia would act as if only the present mattered. Without understanding that present actions have future consequences or rewards, KC would have based his actions only upon immediate outcomes. However, this was not the case.
On a personality test, KC scored as low as possible on measures of hedonism, or the tendency to be a self-indulgent pleasure-seeker.
In systematic tests of his decision-making, carried out with WUSTL’s Len Green, PhD, professor of psychology, and Joel Myerson, PhD, research professor of psychology, and researchers at York University in Toronto, KC also showed that he was willing to trade a smaller, sooner reward for a larger, later reward.
In other words, KC’s inability to remember past events did not affect his ability to appreciate the value of future rewards. 
‘Questions are now wide open’
KC’s case reveals how much is left to discover about memory and how it relates to human understanding of time.
“If you think about memory long enough it starts to sound magical,” Craver said. “How is it that we can replay these events from our lives? And what’s going on in our brains that allows us to re-experience these events from our past?”
Craver hopes that this article — the last to be published about KC during his lifetime — brings these types of questions to the forefront. 
“These findings open up a whole new set of questions about people with amnesia,” Craver said. “Things that we previously thought were closed questions are now wide open.”
(Image credit)

neurosciencestuff:

Those with episodic amnesia are not ‘stuck in time,’ says philosopher Carl Craver

In 1981, a motorcycle accident left Toronto native Kent Cochrane with severe brain damage and dramatically impaired episodic memory. Following the accident, Cochrane could no longer remember events from his past. Nor could he predict specific events that might happen in the future.

When neuroscientist Endel Tulving, PhD, asked him to describe what he would do tomorrow, Cochrane could not answer and described his state of mind as “blank.”

Psychologists and neuroscientists came to know Cochrane, who passed away earlier this year, simply as “KC.” Many scientists have described KC as “stuck in time,” or trapped in a permanent present.

It has generally been assumed that people with episodic amnesia experience time much differently than those with more typical memory function. 

However, a recent paper in Neuropsychologia co-authored by Carl F. Craver, PhD, professor of philosophy and of philosophy-neuroscience-psychology, both in Arts & Sciences at Washington University in St. Louis, disputes this type of claim.

“It’s our whole way of thinking about these people that we wanted to bring under pressure,” Craver said. “There are sets of claims that sound empirical, like ‘These people are stuck in time.’ But if you ask, ‘Have you actually tested what they know about time?’ the answer is no.”

Time and consciousness

A series of experiments convinced Craver and his co-authors that although KC could not remember specific past experiences, he did in fact have an understanding of time and an appreciation of its significance to his life.

Interviews with KC by Craver and his colleagues revealed that KC retained much of what psychologists refer to as “temporal consciousness.” KC could order significant events from his life on a timeline, and he seemed to have complete mastery of central temporal concepts.

For example, KC understood that events in the past have already happened, that they influence the future, and that once they happen, they cannot be changed. 

He also knew that events in the future don’t remain in the future, but eventually become present. Even more interestingly, KC’s understanding of time influenced his decision-making.

If KC truly had no understanding of time, Craver argues, then he and others with his type of amnesia would act as if only the present mattered. Without understanding that present actions have future consequences or rewards, KC would have based his actions only upon immediate outcomes. However, this was not the case.

On a personality test, KC scored as low as possible on measures of hedonism, or the tendency to be a self-indulgent pleasure-seeker.

In systematic tests of his decision-making, carried out with WUSTL’s Len Green, PhD, professor of psychology, and Joel Myerson, PhD, research professor of psychology, and researchers at York University in Toronto, KC also showed that he was willing to trade a smaller, sooner reward for a larger, later reward.

In other words, KC’s inability to remember past events did not affect his ability to appreciate the value of future rewards. 

‘Questions are now wide open’

KC’s case reveals how much is left to discover about memory and how it relates to human understanding of time.

“If you think about memory long enough it starts to sound magical,” Craver said. “How is it that we can replay these events from our lives? And what’s going on in our brains that allows us to re-experience these events from our past?”

Craver hopes that this article — the last to be published about KC during his lifetime — brings these types of questions to the forefront. 

“These findings open up a whole new set of questions about people with amnesia,” Craver said. “Things that we previously thought were closed questions are now wide open.”

(Image credit)

(via meta-maieutics)

— 4 days ago with 229 notes
#Psychology  #Time  #Episodic Amnesia  #Perception  #Memory  #Carl Craver  #Neurology  #Mind 
wisesnail:

Ain’t no thing like me, except me!
Rocket Raccoon - prints on my Society 6! C:

wisesnail:

Ain’t no thing like me, except me!

Rocket Raccoon - prints on my Society 6! C:

(via wrenchandnumbers)

— 4 days ago with 18715 notes
#Rocket Raccoon  #Guardians of the Galaxy  #Illustration  #Wisesnail